Marion Blackberry

More than half the blackberries grown in Oregon are of the Marion variety. The result of cross breeding between the Chehalem and Olallie blackberries, the Marion blackberry was released in 1956 after extensive testing in it’s namesake Marion County, Oregon. The medium-sized berries are conical in shape, longer than they are wide, and appear dark purple to black in color. The fruit has a tart, earthy sweetness, perfect for eating fresh from local farms and markets, or for use year round from frozen in pies, jams, tarts and more. As of July 2017, Marionberry Pie has been designated the official state pie of Oregon.


Plant: tall canes, thorny


Harvest
Oregon Marionberries are harvested early July to early August.
History
Nutrition
1 cupCalories 75.00
Total fat 1.00 g
Protein 1.00 g
Dietary Fiber 7.60 g
Vitamin A 238.00IU
Vitamin C 30.00mg
Calcium 46.00mg
Cholesterol 0.00
ORAC 28 μmole/ g
Anthocyanins 1.55 mg/g
Phenolics 5.83 mg/g

Columbia Star Blackberry

Introduced in 2014, Columbia Star blackberries are named for the Columbia River, an important water way in the geography and history of the Northwest. This high quality, high yielding, thornless variety of blackberry gives similar fruit to the popular Marionberry, which accounts for 20% of it’s parentage. The medium-sized berries are firm and sweet tasting, and appear very dark purple or black in color. The berries are available locally in Oregon to enjoy fresh, or can be used year round from frozen in all sweet or savory dishes.

Plant: short canes, thornless


Harvest
Oregon’s Columbia Star blackberries are harvested in July.
History
Nutrition
100 gramCalories 54.00
Total fat not detected
Protein 0.1g
Dietary Fiber 4.60g
Vitamin A not detected
Vitamin C 2.9 mg
Calcium 20 mg
Cholesterol not detected
Dietary Fiber 4.6 g
Anthocyanin 1.17 mg/g
Total Phenolics 4.14 mg/gNutrition Analysis PDF

Kotata Blackberry

Bred in Oregon, Kotata blackberries were first selected in the 1950’s but only released in 1984 after decades of testing with various growers. It’s genealogy has Boysenberry, wild Pacific Northwest Blackberry, Eastern US Blackberry, and Loganberry in it’s lineage. These small to medium sized blackberries are firm, are glossy deep purple to black in color, are of uniform, longish shape, and have excellent sweet/tart flavor. They are popular for eating fresh throughout the Northwest, or used frozen year round.

Plant: Robust and cold hardy, very thorny

Harvest
Oregon Kotata blackberries are harvested between July and August.
History
Nutrition
100 gramCalories 52.00
Total fat not detected
Protein 0.1
Dietary Fiber 4.9 g
Vitamin A not detected
Vitamin C not detected
Calcium 23.4 mg
Cholesterol 0.00
Anthocyanin 1.71 mg/g
Phenolics 4.30 mg/g
Nutrition Analysis PDF

Silvan Blackberry

Bred in Australia and released in 1984, Silvanberries are a cross between Marionberry, Pacific Blackberry, and Boysenberry. The canes often produce more blackberries per plant than other varietals, which contributes to it’s popularity among farmers. The berries are large in size, are a glossy, dark purple or dark red in color, and are of robust flavor. Their soft skins make them ideally suited for jam making, and they are available frozen year round.

Plant: Long living, very thorny



Harvest
Oregon’s Silvan blackberries are harvested mid-July through August.
History
Nutrition
Calories 53.00
Total fat not detected
Protein 0.2
Dietary Fiber 4.3 g
Vitamin A not detected
Vitamin C not detected
Calcium 19.2 mg
Cholesterol 0.00
Anthocyanin 1.47 mg/g
Phenolics 3.95 mg/gNutrition Analysis PDF

Black Diamond Blackberry

Introduced in 2005, the Black Diamond is a cross between the Kotata Blackberry and a New Zealand Thornless Blackberry. It’s harvest season is identical to Marionberry, and it yields a firm, medium to large berry that is dark purple to black in color. The berries tend to be uniform in shape, have small seeds, and a milder flavor than other Northwest varietals. It can be sold fresh during harvest time at local markets, but is also available frozen year round. This variety is often recommended for home gardens.

Plant: Vigorous, thornless

Harvest
Oregon’s Black Diamond blackberries are harvested late July - August.
History
Nutrition
100 gramCalories 74.00
Total fat not detected
Protein 0.3
Dietary Fiber 5.8 g
Vitamin A not detected
Vitamin C not detected
Calcium 33.3 mg
Cholesterol 0.00
Anthocyanin 1.05 mg/g
Phenolics 6.26 mg/gNutrition Analysis PDF

Chester Blackberry

Developed and introduced in 1998 through joint effort by breeding programs in Illinois, Ohio, and Maryland, this blackberry is named for Dr Chester Zych, the former fruit researcher at the University of Illinois. Chester Blackberries are a late harvest varietal, with the fruit ready for picking from mid-August through to mid-September. These small to medium sized berries are round, of an intense black color, with large seeds, and a good, mild flavor. Due to their tougher skins, they retain their shape when thawed, making them ideal for use as a topping in frozen products.

Plant: Hardy, productive, thornless

Nutrition
100 gramCalories 66.00
Total fat not detected
Protein 0.2
Dietary Fiber 7.0 g
Vitamin A not detected
Vitamin C not detected
Calcium 36.5 mg
Cholesterol 0.00
Anthocyanin 1.71 mg/g
Phenolics 5.21 mg/gNutrition Analysis PDF
Oregon Chester blackberry

Obsidian Blackberry

Released in 2005, the Obsidian blackberry was developed in Oregon and has Marion, Olallie and Boysen berries in its parentage. The berries are large, of good firmness, with small to medium sized seeds, a deep black color, and are of excellent flavor. They are an early harvest variety, with ripe fruit often available in mid to late June. Obsidian Blackberries can be eat fresh if found at local markets, or can be frozen for year round use.

Plant: high yielding, hardy, thorny

Raspberry

Cultivated Red Raspberries were introduced to the United States as long ago as 1771, and were likely among some of the first fruits to be brought West on the Oregon trail in the late 1800’s. Unlike blackberries, raspberries have a hollow core when picked from the plant. The berries are small, with small seeds and appear medium to bright red in color depending on the variety. Their flavor is moderately tart, often sweet and of excellent flavor. A small percentage of the Oregon crop is eaten fresh, with a majority of the berries ending up frozen, pureed or made into juice. A mix of early and late harvest varietals have been planted, giving Oregon a red raspberry harvest season from mid-June to October.

Plant: Vigorous, small thorns

Harvest
Oregon raspberries are harvested between mid-June and late July.
History
Varieties
In Oregon, Meeker and Willamette varieties comprise the vast majority of the commercial red raspberry crops.
Nutrition
500 gramsCalories 60.00
Total fat 1.00 g
Protein 1.00 g
Dietary Fiber 8.4 g
Vitamin A 160.00IU
Vitamin C 30.00mg
Calcium 27.00mg
Cholesterol 0.00
ORAC 24 μmole/ g
Anthocyanins .65 mg/g
Phenolics 5.17 mg/g

Black Raspberry

Black Raspberries are native to North America, and while they grow wild in many parts of the United States, they are only farmed commercially in Oregon, which grows 99% of the annual harvest. While they bear the Raspberry name, they are much stronger in flavor than red or golden varietals and contain many more seeds. These uniquely sweet yet tart berries are blue/black in color, small and round in shape, and are of good firmness. Black raspberries have an extremely dark pigment, which makes them ideally suited to be used as a natural coloring agent. They have some of the highest antioxidant properties of all berries, and are the subject of numerous health benefits studies.

Plant: Vigorous, small but numerous thorns

Harvest
Oregon Black Raspberries have a short harvest window of roughly 3 weeks starting at the beginning of July.
History
Nutrition
100 gramCalories 72.54
Total fat .14 g
Protein 1.35 g
Dietary Fiber 1.68 g
Vitamin A 38.00IU
Vitamin C 2.36mg
Calcium 32.00mg
Cholesterol 0.00
ORAC 77 μmole/ g
Anthocyanins 5.98 mg/g
Phenolics 9.80 mg/g

Loganberry

Loganberries were accidentally created in the 1880’s in California by James Harvey Logan, for whom they are named. The berries from this blackberry and raspberry hybrid resemble blackberries in size and shape, though the color and taste align more with raspberries. Loganberries are deep red in color, with medium sized seeds, a conic shape, and firm but tender skin. Their distinctive, somewhat tart flavor lends them perfectly to jams, pies and wines.

Plant: moderately robust, thorny


Harvest
Oregon Loganberries are harvested mid-July to mid-August.
oregon logan berry

Boysenberry

The parentage of boysenberries is unknown, though it is considered to be a blackberry crossed with a loganberry or red raspberry. Famed berry farmer Walter Knott and George Darrow of the USDA rescued the vines from the Northern California farm of Rudolph Boysen, and transplanted them to Knott’s Berry Farm in the late 1920’s. The berries were sold commercially as “boysenberries” for the first time in 1935 at Walter Knott’s farm stand. Boysenberries are very large in size, deep maroon in color, have large seeds, and a soft, thin skin texture. They are ideally suited for jams, pies, juices, and syrups. Oregon is the #1 producer of boysenberries in the USA.


Plant: Vigorous, thorny

Harvest
Oregon’s Boysenberries are harvested in July.
History
Nutrition
100 gramCalories 50.66
Total fat 0.31 g
Protein 1.33 g
Dietary Fiber 1.75 g
Vitamin C 6.06mg
Calcium 22.67mg
Cholesterol 0.00